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WPML’s tables

Language information and translations

WPML holds the language information in a separate table.

The table that holds the language and translation information is called icl_translations.

  • Each site content element configured as translatable (post, page, tag, category, custom post type, and custom taxonomies) has an entry in this table. Note: Comments are not translatable but they have a record in icl_translations because they have language information assigned to them.
  • The entry specifies the item’s language and the translation group (element type) it belongs to.
  • Entries of the same translation cluster share the same value in element_type and trid columns.
  • The entry with no source language (NULL) in the same cluster is the original entry.

It has the following rows:

  • translation_id – serial number
  • element_type – the type of the element
  • element_id – the ID of the item (post_id for post types, term_taxonomy_id for taxonomy terms)
  • trid – the ID of the translation group
  • language_code – language code of the item
  • source_language_code – if translated, the language of the original item

For example, if we have an English post with ID=3, that is translated to Spanish and the Spanish translation has ID=7, the icl_translations table will look like this:

translation_id element_type element_id trid language_code source_language_code
1 post 3 2 en  NULL
2 post 7 2 es en

* Because the two entries have the same value for trid, they are translations of one another. The value itself is not important.

WPML's icl_translations and associated tables

WPML’s icl_translations and associated tables

Country flags

WPML ships with a large collection of country flags. It’s a well known fact that associating languages with countries is problematic. Many languages are spoken (sometimes differently) in different countries. However, country flags are still a helpful visual cue and help visitor spot their language easily.

WPML’s country flags are stored in the res/flags directory and the icl_flags table indicates which flag to return for each country. The columns of the icl_flags table are:

  • id – serial number
  • lang_code – the language code
  • flag – the name of the flag file
  • from_template – “0”: take the flag from WPML’s res/flags folder, “1”: take the flag from the theme directory

If you want to use a different flag from WPML’s flags collection you can upload your custom flag files from “Edit Language” Panel, on “WPML > Languages > Site Languages” panel. The same administration screen even allows you to insert a custom language. Simply use the “Add language” button below the table and follow the written instructions from the top of the screen.

Edit languages admin screen

“Edit languages” admin screen

String translation

Most WordPress sites include some strings that don’t belong to any item (post, page, tag, category), which still need to be translated – for example, the blog’s tagline.

WPML includes a mechanism, we called String Translation, to handle these strings.

The strings are kept in the icl_strings table with the following columns:

  • id – serial number
  • language – language
  • context – the string’s context (indicates what the string belongs to)
  • name – name of the string
  • value – the strings value (its contents)
  • status – translation status indicating if the string is fully translated to all languages

Translations to the string are kept in the icl_string_translations table:

  • id – serial number
  • string_id – the ID (serial number) of the string being translated
  • language – the language of the translation
  • status – the status of the translation (complete / not complete)
  • value – the translation itself
  • translator_id – id of translator
  • translation_date – date of translation
WPML's  icl_strings and icl_string_translations tables

WPML’s icl_strings and icl_string_translations tables

Viewing WPML’s tables

You can view the contents of WPML’s tables using a database editor such as PHPMyAdmin. A quick way to access your database right from within your WordPress admin is to install a plugin such as Adminer